Shooting Tips

Hockey shooting tips from HockeyShot.
  • Lots of new players don’t take the split second to notice where the goalie is positioned in the net. If the goalie is out of the net, chances are you have less shooting angles, and need to opt for a deke.

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  • The average NHL goalie is about 6-foot-2, and two hundred pounds and change. Vertically, with stacked pads, or in the butterfly position, that eliminates a lot of goal mouth real estate.

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  • Warming up before practice is vital to improve your range of motion, repetition, and ultimately your shot. First, you need to take care of your wrists. So much power and energy comes from a simple snap of the wrists that it's crucial to warm them up before shooting.

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  • You were having a great day, everything seemed normal. Then, you went to HockeyShot.com, where the title of an article said “Don’t Shoot the Puck!”

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  • You can find a lot of hockey passing tips and shooting advice on HockeyShot.com, though the only way to really get good at them is to practice them in an environment where you can concentrate, and get really good at them. You want to practice receiving the pass with your back to the net, so you get some practice taking a pass, moving and shooting.

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  • Developing a great snap shot helps you capitalize on scoring opportunities, and catch goaltenders off guard when you’re in front of the net. This shot makes an excellent apition to your hockey skills arsenal. There are a number of things you’ll want to keep in mind to make the snap shot a natural part of your game. When you are between the hash marks, or on the point, the snap shot stance can let you fake the goalie out as to whether you’re going to shoot on goal, or pass to your lin...

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  • It would be great if all your shots on net were from a straight on breakaway with a head of steam. The reality is, you are often dodging and deking around in your opponent’s end, the neutral zone and your own end of the ice. Should you find yourself looping around and ready to fire on the net, you have to be prepared to make a shot or maybe a few

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  • You skate in front of the opponent’s net and are all alone with the puck. You can stop and think about the best form to shoot the puck or you can shoot the best you can, based on the circumstances. By the time you get the shot off, the opposing defensemen might rob you.

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  • When executed properly, the Wrap Around shot is a thing of beauty. The general idea is to come in on the goalie on one side of the net, skate with the puck behind the net and emerge on the opposite side to stuff it in if the goalie can't move fast enough to cover the post. As with many moves in hockey, timing is everything. But what happnes when you encounter issues like the goalie getting there fast enough or a defenseman blocking your attempt? This video highlights those situations.

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  • Whether you are a novice hockey player, or an experienced one, learning how to transfer your weight properly is a great way to improve your shot. You can prepare yourself, or your team, to use weight transfer strategies with some simple hockey drills. Using your leg muscles will give you an explosive shot, so you can take the best advantage of your scoring opportunities.

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