Hockey Tips, Drills & Product Reviews

Find everything you need to know about hockey from some of the best experts in the world. Your game will never be the same!

Here you will find everything you need to know from some of the BEST EXPERTS IN THE WORLD OF HOCKEY. A vast collection of tips on shooting, passing, stickhandling, skating, training, goaltending and mental/ emotional preparation. These are all IMPORTANT SKILLS when it comes to playing hockey and understanding these tips will give you an incredible amount of knowledge about every subject you can shake a stick at. To be successful, it helps to learn from the best and with each post in this section you are receiving QUALIFIED RESOURCES to help make you unstoppable out there on the ice. Playing the game is half the battle, to be fully prepared when you step into the rink make sure you study these guidelines. They will absolutely GIVE YOU AN EDGE VERSUS THE COMPETITION. There are not only written articles throughout this section, but also video posts to give you step-by-step visuals at how to further your hockey career!

  • You were having a great day, everything seemed normal. Then, you went to HockeyShot.com, where the title of an article said “Don’t Shoot the Puck!”

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  • You can find a lot of hockey passing tips and shooting advice on HockeyShot.com, though the only way to really get good at them is to practice them in an environment where you can concentrate, and get really good at them. You want to practice receiving the pass with your back to the net, so you get some practice taking a pass, moving and shooting.

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  • For novice and even experienced hockey players, the ability to maintain speed through turns, and changing directions without slowing down is a challenging skill to master. Many players feel challenged by executing the turn or direction change they feel like they are going to fall in towards the direction they are turning.

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  • The whistle has blown on an offside, and you are the closest player to the puck. You notice the closest referee is favouring his back, and want to do the Zebra a solid by handing him the puck, so he doesn’t have to kneel and scoop. Remembering that time you learned the Scoopy Puck Move on the HockeyShot.com website; you skillfully use your stick to pop the puck off the ice, cradle it, and hand it over to the grateful ref.

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  • The Weighted Sled sounds like a winter exercise, but you are probably more accustomed to seeing it associated with football practice than hockey. Of course, there is the HockeySled training device for using with your hockey stick, to create some explosive power and prevent injury.

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  • Do you need to work on your shooting accuracy? Looking for a simple, cost effective way to improve your shot? Well then the HockeyShot Extreme Goal Targets are for you.

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  • Four time Canadian Olympian, and celebrated figure skating champion Elvis Stojko talked to fitness guru Stephen J. Wong about his love of HockeyShot.com’s Extreme Glide Synthetic Ice.

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  • The following article was written by hockey strength and conditioning coach Dan Garner, who contributes to www.HockeyTraining.com on a regular basis. Check out the website if you are interested in more hockey training articles. Enjoy the post!.

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  • In this video, you will learn about how to maximize your off ice training with the HockeyShot Slide Board Pro. Not only are you introduced to the product but you will learn how to develop excellent skating form and see some variations on drills to improve your performance. The basic function of the Slide Board is to work on the side to side skating motion and improve your skating form and strength without ice.

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  • One of the hockey skills which is often neglected, or isn’t taught as effectively as it should is how to receive a pass. Many young hockey players either have the puck deflect off to an opposing player because they aren’t cushioning the puck, or dribble off the end of their stick because they are cushioning the puck too much.

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